News

White House delays key element of health care law

White House delays key element of health care law

Photo: Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama’s health care law seems to be losing much of its sweep.

On Tuesday, the administration unexpectedly announced a one-year delay, until after the 2014 elections, in a central requirement of the law that medium and large companies provide coverage for their workers or face fines.

Separately, opposition in the states from Republican governors and legislators has steadily undermined a Medicaid expansion that had been expected to provide coverage to some 15 million low-income people.

Tuesday’s move sacrificed timely implementation of the law but might help Democrats politically by blunting an election-year line of attack Republicans were planning to use. The employer requirements are among the most complex parts of the health care overhaul.

Business groups were jubilant about the delay.

News

in Entertainment

Nicholas Hoult to take on J.D. Salinger in new biopic

Fresh
nicholashoult

The British actor will portray the beloved American author in "Rebel in the Rye."

in Entertainment

‘Spectre’ could be Daniel Craig’s last ‘Bond’ movie

Fresh
danielcraig

The British star, whose turn in "Spectre" marks his fourth time playing 007, has now admitted he has no current plans to appear in another Bond movie

in National

Harriet Tubman, Susan B. Anthony among frontrunners for new $10 bill

God Money

Officials plan to make a decision by this fall with the total redesign completed by 2020, the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote.

in Entertainment

Why Bill Murray is in the new ‘Ghostbusters’ movie

24-overlay

After spending a quarter of a century not agreeing to be in "Ghostbusters 3" as Peter Venkman, Bill Murray recently signed on to Paul Feig’s reboot of the franchise.

in Entertainment, Sports

Will Smith to take on NFL coverup

21-overlay

"Concussion" is based on Dr. Bennet Omalu, who was the first to discover the existence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (or CTE): a disease of the brain found in athletes with a history of repetitive brain trauma.