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Lawyers settle Paula Deen lawsuit in Georgia

Lawyers settle Paula Deen lawsuit in Georgia

Television personality Paula Deen poses for a portrait in New York. Photo: Associated Press/Jeff Christensen

SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Attorneys have signed an agreement to dismiss a sexual harassment and discrimination lawsuit against celebrity cook Paula Deen and her brother.

A document filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Savannah, Ga., said both sides reached a settlement “without any award of costs or fees to any party.”

Former employee Lisa Jackson sued Deen and her brother, Bubba Hiers, last year saying she worked for years in an environment rife with racial slurs and sexual innuendo as manager of Uncle Bubba’s Seafood and Oyster House in Savannah.

Deen says in a statement that she is “looking forward to getting this behind me,” but says she also plans to review workplace environment issues raised in the lawsuit.

A judge dismissed the race discrimination claims on Aug. 12.

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