Kanye West ordered to stay away from L.A. photographer

Kanye West ordered to stay away from L.A. photographer

BATTERY CHARGES: Los Angeles prosecutors charged West with misdemeanor battery and attempted grand theft on Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, over a scuffle with a photographer at Los Angeles International Airport in July. Photo: Associated Press

Rapper Kanye West has been ordered to keep his distance from a photographer he is accused of assaulting during a run-in outside Los Angeles International Airport in July.

The “Stronger” hitmaker was slapped with battery and attempted grand theft charges after he allegedly tried to grab paparazzo Daniel Ramos’ camera and wrestle him to the ground this summer.

West insists he acted in self-defense, and, during a court hearing on Monday, a California judge ruled that both parties must stay at least 10 yards away from one another.

West’s lawyer, Blair Berk, also successfully demanded access to all information prosecutors have gathered for the criminal battery case, while there was another small victory for the hip-hop star when the judge rejected authorities’ request to have the musician undergo anger management classes in order to remain free on bail, reports

The rapper faces up to a year behind bars if convicted of the charges.


in National

Police arrest gunman after fatal siege at Colorado abortion clinic


Police arrested a gunman who stormed a Planned Parenthood abortion clinic in Colorado Springs.

in Black Friday, Lifestyle, National

Black Friday crowds thin in subdued start to holiday shopping


America's annual Black Friday shopping extravaganza was short on fireworks this year.

in National

Making headlines this week

Santa Claus participates in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on Thursday, Nov. 26, 2015, in New York. (Photo by Scott Roth/Invision/AP)

A look at some of this week's biggest newsmakers and the headlines you may have missed.

in National

Smartphones may have role in rise of U.S. traffic deaths


The number of deaths from traffic accidents jumped 8.1 percent in the first half of 2015, suggesting smartphones and other driving distractions could be making America's roadways more dangerous.