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Poll: Americans divided on paying for roads

Poll: Americans divided on paying for roads

TRAFFIC: This photo, taken April 14, shows one section of the $500 million I-75 Phase II modernization project which is under way in Dayton, Ohio. On the road in a tour bus this week, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx is urging Congress to quickly approve legislation to pay for highway and transit programs amid warnings that the U.S. government’s Highway Trust Fund is nearly broke. If allowed to run dry, that could threaten to set back or shut down projects across the country, force widespread layoffs of construction workers and delay needed repairs and improvements. Photo: Associated Press/Skip Peterson

JOAN LOWY, Associated Press
JENNIFER AGIESTA, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of Americans agree that the cost of good transportation is worthwhile, but they’re divided over how to pay for it.

A new Associated Press-GfK poll found 6 in 10 of those surveyed say the economic benefits of good highways, railroads and airports outweigh the cost. Yet there is scant support for some of the most frequently discussed options for paying for construction of new roads or the upkeep of existing ones.

Of those surveyed, 58 percent oppose raising federal gasoline taxes to fund transportation projects.

Only 14 percent support an increase. By better than 2-to-1, Americans oppose having private companies pay for construction of new roads and bridges in exchange for the right to charge tolls.

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