Family says Casey Kasem found in Washington state

Family says Casey Kasem found in Washington state

FOUND: Casey Kasem, seen here in 2003, is in poor health and at the center of a legal battle between his children and his wife. Photo: Associated Press

SEATTLE (Reuters) – Casey Kasem, the ailing radio personality and voice of Shaggy on the “Scooby-Doo” cartoons, has been located in the state of Washington after his daughter told a court his whereabouts were unknown to her.

Ken Dickinson, a spokesman for the Kitsap County Sheriff’s Office, told Reuters Kasem, who suffers from dementia, and his wife were in an undisclosed location in the county and had told authorities they were visiting longtime friends.

A Los Angeles court on Monday named the radio celebrity’s daughter, Kerri Kasem, his temporary conservator, although his exact whereabouts were unknown.

The ruling was the latest legal tussle between Kasem’s children and their stepmother, Jean Kasem, over visitation and caretaking for the 82-year-old, who is most famous for his weekly top 40 countdown show.

He suffers from a form of dementia called Lewy Body Disease.

(Reporting by Eric M. Johnson in Seattle Editing by Jeremy Gaunt)


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